PROPHETIC DIAGRAMS

14th December 2012 - 16th February 2013

CLOSING PARTY, Friday 15th February, 6:30 - 9 pm

CLAIRE DORSETT

You Do The Talking

9th - 30th November

Private view Thursday 8th November, 6:30 - 9:30pm

PETER AINSWORTH

Unsounded Surplus

CAPITAL

12th October - 2nd November 2012

Click to preview exhibition

TOM POPE

So It Goes

14th September - 5th October 2012

TOM WEBB

Holding Hands Chasing the Moonlight

10th - 31st August 2012

CAPITAL

Emma Charles, Fergus Heron, Thorsten Knaub, Karen Knorr, Martin Newth, Eva Stenram, Danny Treacy

CAPITAL

13 July – 3rd August 2012

Click to preview exhibition

PAULINA MICHNOWSKA

Lost in Space Forever

Paulina Michnowska

4th - 27th May 2012
Private view: Thursday 7th June 6.30-9pm

WILLIAM CORWIN

Mount Zion

Mount Zion

8th June - 30th June 2012
Private View: Thursday 3rd May 6.30-9pm

Paddy Gould and Roxy Topia

Drip into something more comfortable

Drip into something more comfortable

29th March - 22nd April 2012
Private View: Thursday 29th March 6 - 9pm

Press release

CHRIS BAKER

9th - 25th March 2012

Leoht (St Sebastien)

Chris Baker
9th - 25th March 2012
Private View: Thursday 8th March 6.30 - 9pm

Sluice Art Fair

15th – 16th October 2011

sluice_2011

SLUICE is both exhibition space and platform for discussion and creation. Featuring an open layout for expansive installations, performative works and screenings including a multifaceted supporting programme consisting of a preview breakfast, panel discussions, art-making educational activities for children and young people and artist publishing bookstands. Primarily (but not solely) focusing on artist run not-for-profit spaces, SLUICE does not wish to be didactic but rather provide an informal and accessible temporary platform for young galleries and project spaces to exhibit their artists’ work, gain exposure and encourage dialogue between artists, curators and audiences. Located in central London, a few minutes walk from Bond Street Underground station. Running over the weekend of 15-16 October with late opening and free entry SLUICE is designed to enable access to all. SLUICE will serve as a punctuation point to the London Art Fair week. SLUICE is organised by the London based artist Karl England and curator Ben Street.

Press release

CLAIRE DORSETT

14th – 29th September 2011
15 Camden High Street, London, NW1 7JE

sluice_2011

George and Jorgen are please to present an exhibition of new works by Claire Dorsett: ‘Go Big or Go Home’. Dorsett makes big paintings. She takes notes, writes down jokes, one-liners, thoughts, records memories, and scales them up into mammoth, heroic paintings. They often have a self-mocking or dark wit. Claire Dorsett’s ‘big simple bold things’ are huge paintings that have a dominant presence but an approachable manner. The brush-work, colour, scale, and uncomplicated form, combine to create bold, eye-grabbing giants which also have about them a self-conscious smallness.  Dorsett graduated with an MFA from the Slade School of Art in 2010.  Since, she has been selected for various group exhibitions in London, and most recently shortlisted for this year’s Threadneedle Prize. At the Slade, Claire won the Andor Scholarship, The Nicholas Volley Bursary, and the Peter and Betty McLean Memorial Prize.  This year she has been awarded the Harry Walker Young Artist Prize by Bath Society of Artists.  Dorsett’s fondness of painting billboard scale can make it difficult for the majority of her work to be seen in one place. Using the vast warehouse space at Camden Town Unlimited, George and Jorgen invite you to view the paintings en mass.

Press release

Nick Roberts: L A C U N A

25th August – 8th September 2011

sluice_2011

George and Jørgen are pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Nick Roberts.   The idea behind this new collection of work is to attempt an understanding of psychical shifts, through objects. Familiar settings and domestic objects are manipulated into a conversion of meaning.   Throughout Nick's work runs this flux between, knowing and recognition, to uncertainty, confusion and break down. His interests in psychoanalytical ideas are confronted through coarse and domestic materials.  He endeavours to indicate something of an internal landscape by using external objects. Through working with carbon paper he suggests something about the way we leave a mark or imitate what has come before. It is at this moment that we hold our breath, to impress or to be impressed. What is outside must leave a mark inside, and so-forth. Lacuna amnesia, in psychology, amnesia about a specific event Lacuna (manuscripts), a missing section of text Lacuna (linguistics), a lexical gap in a language

Press release 

Bryon Pritchard

At Burgh House, Hampstead
27th – 31th July 2011, Private View: 27th July

sluice_2011

Set in Burgh House, a grade 1 listed building in the heart of Hampstead, George and Jørgen are pleased to present a solo exhibition of work by Byron Pritchard. The exhibition also marks the beginning of a series of off-site projects for the gallery. Pritchard has spent years developing and experimenting with styles and ideas. Having travelled to New York and Atlanta, amassed thousands of photographs and perfected his developing and tinting techniques, this show is the consummation of his work so far. From the body of Pritchard’s work a fluent language has evolved which will now be presented alone “It is a visual language which I have created, and will get to share for the first time.” he says. It is this coherent means of communication that he admires so much in the careers of Lucien Freud, Francis Bacon, and supportive friends Gilbert and George, a quality which he evidently believes takes time and maturity to achieve. The focus of Pritchard’s attention is on the cyclic nature of life, he sees the rising of successive generations of culture akin to the yearly bloom of plants and flowers. “The flowers are quite significant in my work, they’re the metaphor for me: that idea of death and regeneration, cultures going round and round. “But things stop sometimes, and that cycle just ends. A flower blooms and dies in and endless cycle, then a man picks that flower to give to a girl. Often you have to sacrifice something in order to start something new. There have been those moments in history too.” Pritchard’s work celebrates the unpredictable processes that shape culture and nature year on year; these processes are present also in his technique. He talks of ‘cooking’ ideas and preparing ‘ingredients’ before setting his work in motion. “I know what I want to put into a picture. I start cooking it and I don’t know what’s going to happen in that middle part. I feel like that frees me up to make decisions along the way. Then I make that final decision. The final decision I make is the finishing touch, whether it’s a splash of paint, or a slash of a knife, or a wash of colour, there will be a point where it’s finished.” Although some of the larger pieces are work in progress, this exhibition has been through a lengthy period of gestation inside Pritchards mind, he says, “It’s hard for me to talk about something that’s not quite realised yet, because in my mind it is realised. I’ve decided on my format, on my process, and now I have the opportunity to put my neck on the line.”

Press release

Helen Lee

2nd – 16th July 2011, Private View: Wednesday 6th July

sluice_2011

George and Jørgen are pleased to present a solo exhibition of artist Helen Lee. Divided into landscapes and portraits, the autobiographical paintings have been selected from the past ten years and depict episodes from her life. Helen Lee embraces the language of skewed perspective, wobbly lines and childlike characters normally associated with ‘outsider’ or ‘naive’ art; which totally contradicts the level of technical sophistication in the work. Helen’s high awareness of and confidence in the materials are hidden beneath gutsy and emotive subjects: “Helen Lee is a resourceful painter whose work hovers close to caricature but has a weight and presence that the term might not fully convey” Mel Gooding, Arts Review. Looking at Helen’s portraiture is like peeking through a dirty window into a space alive with action and mayhem. At once familiar yet utterly unknown like newly woken-from dreams, the works are layered beneath a fog which evokes a strong sense of intrigue and uneasy danger. The landscapes have a haunting, spooky ambience too but are rooted in a reality: they are a response to her travels across the world. Helen manages to describe the actual physicality of the place: the heat, light and space with atmospheric abstraction. Helen Lee left the Royal College of Art in 1978; prizes include a John Moores Painting Prize, Royal Scottish Academy Student Award, Adam Bruce Thompson Award, Anne Redpath Award, Latimer Award, Sports Council Prize and the Alexander Flynn Bequest.

Press release

JAMES PIMPERTON

14th - 30th June 2011
Private View: Wednesday 15th June 6-9pm

sluice_2011

James Pimperton’s paintings evoke hyper-real non-spaces, they are dream-like depictions of composite landscapes; in the midst of grand deserts or fictitious valleys, three-point perspective is abandoned and the laws of physics no longer apply. The landscape is riddled with interruptions - jumps in painterly language that simultaneously deny the painting’s synthesis as a constant view and explore a heterogeneous and unstable dimension. An uneasy hybrid is created that is somehow timeless, an a-historical panoptic view of painting. Painting, like our perception of the world, is a construct. It is never stable and reflects the individual as much as what is perceived. We have to believe in our perception while concurrently questioning it; this dichotomy is alluded to in the paintings through their discreet structural disharmony, formal contrasts and dualities. Pimperton’s recent paintings have explored breaking the rules of stable representation and as he has done so he has identified three states of painting that he attempts to bring together in his work. The first of these is representation, the second is abstraction and the third is material. He has been using geological formations, weather events and machines as transitional flows or processes that, within the logic of the painting, could conceivably cause the jumps between the three states. These mechanisms within the painting are transformative in character and cause representational passages of the painting to be eroded, consumed, processed or deconstructed; their state changing to abstract forms or into the material paint from which they are formed, then taking those raw materials and transforming them back into new representational forms. This cyclical process of degeneration, transformation and regeneration is one evident across nature, culture and, self-referentially, the creative practice of painting. Pimperton studied for BA (Hons) Fine Art at University College Falmouth. Since graduating in 2007, he has taken part in the artist led exhibition Sunrise with Sea Monsters in London’s Docklands; he has exhibited at Campden Gallery, and also in Penzance as part of the Revolver exhibition series. He lives and works in Leicester. George and Jørgen are proud to present the first solo exhibition of his work in London.

Press release

Blue Darling

30 May – 11 June 2011
Private View 1 June, 6-9pm

sluice_2011

George and Jørgen present Blue Darling, a showcase of five artists brought together by Oliver Bedeman, artist and curator. Simultaneously dripping in macabre imagery and also sharp with a razor wit Timothy Betjeman, Aidan Doherty, Claire Dorsett, Gaby Gatacre and James Trimmer are all contemporary painters who share a consistent dark humor in their work. Blue Darling represents a group of young artists who, whilst nodding to the past, embrace a future where painting has a fresh relevance. Although all of the artists are young, between them they have already amassed a healthy collection of awards and residencies including: The Prince’s Drawing School, residencies in Kensington Palace and India, shortlists for Saatchi’s 4 New Sensations, the Celeste Art Prize and the Jerwood Contemporary Painters.

Press release

Martin Newth: Sentinel

10th – 29th May 2011
Private View: Wednesday 11th May 6-9pm

sluice_2011

Built during the Second World War in anticipation of a German invasion the austere fortified structures of pillboxes peppered both the British coastline and en route to major urban centres. With a rocky history, where the majority of Britain's static defences were destroyed even before the end of the war, now an estimated 6,000 pillboxes still remain. Artist Martin Newth has tracked down and photographed several of them over the past two years. His starkly objective black and white photographs indicate their varying architectural designs, building materials, and how they have now become subsumed into the landscape. Whether buried in undergrowth, part submerged in sea, or masked in graffiti and vandalism, these portraits reveal the marginal status that pillboxes have in our society today. Newth has also been transforming the small dark chambers into cameras. With the use of a simple lens and sheets of colour photographic paper he has made large photographic negatives on site. The images, shown here for the first time, depict the scenes over which the pillboxes have stood sentinel for the past 65 years. The vivid red of the negatives - a result of Newth’s use of colour sensitive paper – shows the landscape in great detail and with a dramatic theatricality relating to the original intended war time function of the buildings. Thirdly Newth has created a three screen video installation. The small apertures in the pillboxes, which were formerly used as gun emplacements, have instead been used to locate a camera and shoot video. The separate viewpoints are shown side by side to present a looped, moving panorama, where the architecture dictates the framing of the landscape; in this case a pillbox on the beach in Studland, Dorset, that is gradually slipping into the sea. Once an indicator of a united stand in defence of enemy invasion the viewer is invited to consider what pillboxes may represent today. Here it rather signifies the contemporary threat of rising sea levels and an impending ecological crisis. Born in Manchester in 1973, Martin Newth studied at Newcastle University and the Slade School of Art. His approach is informed by a concern for the process of photography as well as the product, exploring its historical routes and raising questions about its aesthetics in the 21st century. He has exhibited nationally and internationally at: Axel Lapp Projects, Berlin; Focal Point Gallery, Southend; Ffotogallery, Cardiff; Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool; and the Kunstverein Konstanz, Germany. Newth is Course Director of BA Photography at Camberwell College of Arts.

Press release

WILLIAM CORWIN “Alan's Wood”

alans wood
March 15 - April 2, 2011
Private View Thursday, March 17, 6-9pm

sluice_2011

George and Jørgen are pleased to present the first London exhibition of the work of American sculptor William Corwin. Corwin produces site-specific sculptures that play with the architecture they inhabit, while also combining a poetic historical narrative redolent of Kiefer combined with a pure abstract aesthetic reminiscent of Nicholson in St. Ives and Twombly in Rome. For this exhibition, he will create two structures within the gallery, one a diorama entitled “Diet of Worms, Part 2“ and the second a shelving piece based on the Last Judgment mosaic in the Cathedral of St. Maria Assunta in Torcello, and will also exhibit several smaller shrine pieces and drawings. Corwin’s recent “Diet of Worms“ installation at the Hudson Guild Gallery in New York played with the idea of a diorama/viewing box that stringently forced the spectator into a series of prescribed picturesque/dystopian views, vaguely similar to a Capability Brown garden or a 19th century light box show. Greg Volk wrote in a review, “Corwin’s structure is wilfully awkward, uncomfortable, and ungainly and it forces one to scrunch down or contort oneself in order to peer through the peepholes. Yet this experience reveals sophisticated, oftentimes riveting, views which tend to scramble one’s orientation and apprehension. At all points Corwin’s meticulous arrangement of materials in a restricted space seems peculiarly expansive, embracing cycles of aspiration and failure, regeneration and decay.“Corwin’s less claustrophobic “Library“ sculptures, pieces that play with the idea of hidden spaces as well as “sculpture as furniture,“ often tantalize the viewer with a wealth of visual information, yet tease the viewer more with what is not shown. Max Weintraub wrote of the work, “Corwin’s cluttered collection of stacked tablets tease the visitor with only partial views of their colourfully illuminated surfaces. As such, our experience of the work quickly devolves into a playful exercise in–and ultimately a meditation on–unfulfilled spectatorial desire, as the contents of the shelved tomes remains elusive, and our attempts to salvage meaning from them are thwarted at every turn.“ Will Corwin has shown at numerous alternative spaces in the New York area--he started with a series of regular shows from 1998-2005 at the LaMama Gallery (the visual arts branch of the famed LaMama etc. Theater), and has worked with The Theater for the New City, chashama, Gallery Aferro, The Flushing Town Hall (a Smithsonian Affiliate), The Hudson Guild and The Michael Steinberg Gallery. Internationally he has exhibited at The Red Gate Gallery in Beijing, The Taipei Artists Village, Taiwan, Kunstlerhaus FRISE, Hamburg, and currently has an online Drawing Residency at The Centre For Recent Drawing, in London. He is in the collections of Mr. Robin Vousden, Kimberly and Stephen Quinn, Mayor of London Boris Johnson, and Zubin Mehta, Alanna Heiss and James Al Fayed in New York. He is slated to do a project with the Clocktower Gallery in New York in 2011-12, which most recently had an exhibition of the work of James Franco.

Press release

Exploration and Intervention: New Landscape Photography

8th February – 11th March 2011.
Private view on Thursday 10th, Feb 6-9pm.

sluice_2011

Five contemporary artists who produce photographic images in innovative ways have been selected for Exploration and Intervention: New Landscape Photography at George and Jørgen. Acknowledging that the founding fathers of photography were pioneering scientists, and interpreting the landscape as a place for exploration, this exhibition is an exciting opportunity to view work by a new generation of image-makers who unite contemporary practise with an historic theme. George and Jørgen proudly introduce Peter Ainsworth, Alejandro Guijarro, Martina Lindqvist, Byron Pritchard, and Kurt Tong. As a continuation of his Concrete Islands, prize winning artist Peter Ainsworth exhibits part of his most recent project The Drowned World 2010; an intriguing body of work where he takes the viewer on a visual journey to rarely seen or considered places, in this case the walls that support a flyover of the A406. The portraits subtly critique the complex urban environment that we find ourselves in and prompt us to question our surroundings, where controlled views highlight a glimpse of life amidst dense manmade landscapes. The magnificent simplicity of these compositions is echoed in Alejandro Guijarro’s Mountain where he documents human intervention on a much larger scale, capturing fog of pollution over mountains in China. Byron Pritchard explores the creative possibilities of photography throughout the entirety of its process. Developing unique prints from his self built darkroom, Pritchard’s floral imagery has a Victorianna aesthetic but explores contemporary photographic theory. Kurt Tong’s approach to assist the degradation of film in Memories, Dreams, Interrupted centres itself around the idea of how memories are formed, and the photographs themselves become interpretations of his own experiences that constantly fade or are skewed. The ephemeral quality to his illusory photographs is also distinct in Martina Lindqvist’s images from A Thousand Little Suns. Jerwood Photography Award winner Lindqvist revolutionises the familiar and memorable landscape of her native Finland, creating surreal worlds that echo the actual existence of the place.

Press release

PRESS RELEASE – NEW CONTEMPORARY ART: PART 1

Exhibition dates: 25th November 2010 – 30th January 2011

sluice_2011

George and Jørgen are opening a brand new gallery space in the heart of London’s West End from the 26th November 2010 (private view 2nd December, 18:00). With a residency at the Salvation Army on Princes Street, they will launch with an exciting collection of work by 10 new contemporary artists. The exhibition includes painting and sculpture by recent graduates of the Royal Academy, the Slade School of Fine Art and other emerging artists. Drawing on their years of experience working for both private dealers and arts institutions; George and Jørgen have selected a crop of new talent and offer a refreshing insight into the new contemporary art scene. Artists include: Chris Baker, Claire Dorsett, Gaby Gatacre, Paddy Gould and Roxy Topia, Michael Jones, Paulina Michnowska, James Pimperton, Oliver Rafferty, Gaetan Sigonney, and Jonathan Trayte. Embarking on various projects both in England and abroad, an attractive programme of contemporary exhibitions follows.